Moneta Gallery Coin Museum



Users 11,536
Photos 2,670
Comments 234
Views 10,254,671
Disk Space 255.0mb

SunMon TueWed ThuFri Sat
      1
2345678
9101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
3031     

Moneta 1858
Zantetsuken 293
Chinacash 170
stretrader99z 122
jumanji 58

Nemausus.jpg
Augustus & Agrip
Moneta

[ Julio-Claudian: 27 B.C - 68 A.D. ]
NeroAs.jpg
Nero Victory As
Moneta

[ Julio-Claudian: 27 B.C - 68 A.D. ]
Caligula.jpg
Caligula, As 37-4
Moneta

[ Julio-Claudian: 27 B.C - 68 A.D. ]
spes-upload.jpg
CLAUDIUS with SPES
petitioncrown

[ Julio-Claudian: 27 B.C - 68 A.D. ]
Rom_Tiberias_den_Livia.jpg
Rome - Tiberius -
Moneta

[ Julio-Claudian: 27 B.C - 68 A.D. ]
NeroAsHarp.jpg
Nero playing Lyre, A
Moneta

[ Julio-Claudian: 27 B.C - 68 A.D. ]
· more ·

 

« Previous image · Next image »

Augustus & Agrippa Nemausus Crocodile
Augustus & Agrippa Nemausus Crocodile

Click on image to view larger image

« Previous image  · Slide Show · Next image »

Moneta



Registered: August 2005
Location: Arizona USA
Posts: 1,875
users gallery
Soon after 27 B.C. and further conquests in Spain, Augustus had an interest in the coinage needs of the western territories (Spain and Gaul). The well populated and romanized area of southern Gaul needed a new coinage. This example of a coin issued for Nemausus (today's Nimes, France# served the purpose and spread widely. It's often found halved, and this example shows evidence of divisional scratching.
OB: heads of Augustus #laureate to right, obscured# and Arippa with rostral crown are back to back; IMP DIVI #F#. Rx: crocodile chained to palm, wreath above; COL NEM in field #indicates Colonia Nemausus). Struck from 10 B.C. onwards; 26 mm, 11.45 gms.


The crocodile coinage of Nemausus has delighted collectors for years. Research has shown that the coinage can be grouped into three distinct time periods based on the addition or omission of a headdress of some sort on the bust of Augustus. This coin was struck during the period after the death of Augustus c. 9/8-3 BC or during the reign of Claudius.
Nemausus was in the region of Gaul in modern day France (city of Nimes). Today, If one visits, there are still numerous references to this glorious coinage. The image of the crocodile chained to a post symbolized the subjugation of Egypt during the reign of Julius Caesar around 30 BC. The soldiers from this initiative were given plots of land to farm and quickly began to populate the city. The coinage served to memorialize the relationship to their new home. While Caesar inspired the coinage, Augustus created a major mint in the town of Nemausus and literally put the city on the map. This coinage was struck in abundance and served a large portion of the western Roman empire.
The meaning of the palm on the reverse is a matter of debate. Long before the Romans, the Volcae tribe dominated the area starting around the 3rd century BC. Pre-dating the Augustan coinage, there was already palm imagery, thus it could symbolize the relationship to the previous inhabitants.
The city enjoyed prosperity until the end of the 3rd century AD when it diminished in stature. The ruler Antoninus Pius (reigned 138-161 AD) came from Nemausus. In 473 AD the city was taken from the Romans by the Visigoths. [Shanna Schmidt Numismatics]
· Date: February 28, 2010 · Views: 3,651 · Filesize: 30.3kb, 74.8kb · Dimensions: 838 x 426 ·
Keywords: Cocodile of Nemausus

Rom_CAugustus_den_Temple.jpg
Rom_Tiberias_den_Livia.jpg
Nemausus.jpg
spes-upload.jpg
NeroAsHarp.jpg
NeroAs.jpg
Claudius.jpg
Caligula.jpg
tiberius_denarius_2.jpg


Photo Sharing Gallery by PhotoPost
Copyright © 2007 All Enthusiast, Inc.

No portion of this page, text, images or code, may be copied, reproduced, published or distributed in any medium without the expressed written permission of the copyright holder.